Tips on using Passwords to Protect Against ID and Business Theft

Tips on using Passwords to Protect Against ID and Business Theft

Ah, those pesky passwords. If you work in the corporate world or in an office, you have one for your PC/Network and, unless there is a password synchronization application that combines them, you probably have more than one for other applications. Add those to the ones that you have for your home Internet, your banking and other websites that require passwords, and before you know it you have a nightmare on your hands in trying to manage them. Part of the frustration has to do with the different requirements for password formatting. Some systems only require four characters, some require eight. Some need a combination of alpha and numeric characters and others do the same with the addition of a few capital letters thrown in for extra security. It can be positively maddening. The worst thing you can do with your passwords is to place them in a text document which can be accessed on the hard drive of your computer. Your files are vulnerable – even if you think they are not. If someone is intent on finding them, they can. Even if you place them into a password protected document, those can be cracked, too. Writing them down has its own vulnerabilities, too, and there are varying opinions on this practice. If you do write them down on a piece of paper, put the document in a locked location whether it is in your home or at work.Here are 6 tips on how to handle your passwords: 1 . Make them complex. People who use easy to remember or short passwords are inviting disaster. Use a little...