End of life for Windows 7?

End of life for Windows 7?

Is it the end of life for windows 7? Fear not. Windows 7 is well entrenched in business, but interestingly it has just appeared on the list for Microsoft mainstream support. So we thought we should mention that. We will eventually see the product in all its 10 variants slowly edge towards extended support (January 13 2015), then into non supported mode (at the end of 2020). Mainstream support for Windows 7 will end on 13 January 2015 – which is only 5 months away. While this is not as business-critical as the Windows XP deadline last April, it is likely to get companies starting to plan their next upgrade cycle either around Windows 8.1 or Windows 9. Planning sooner than later helps plan your IT expenditure. Other products included on that list include Windows Server 2008, Windows Phone 7.8, Windows Storage Server 2008, Exchange Server 2010 and Dynamics. “Every Windows product has a lifecycle. The lifecycle begins when a product is released and ends when it’s no longer supported,” Microsoft recently explained in a Forbes article. “Knowing key dates in this lifecycle helps you make informed decisions about when to upgrade or make other changes to your software.” What Windows 7 users must know, however, is that they have to be running Windows 7 Service Pack 1 for these days to apply. Support for Windows 7 RTM (Released to Manufacturing – the original release software) was stopped back on 9 April 2013 – so if for some reason you aren’t keeping Windows 7 up to date do so immediately. On 13 January 2015 Windows 7’s ‘Mainstream Support’ will...

windows xp end of life

So here we are at the windows xp end of life. Microsoft has made a decision to end support for its 12-year-old OS Windows XP in April 2014 The fast looming deadline for Windows XP support will galvanise hackers, as they target hundreds of millions of users on unpatched systems. Microsoft has already granted the 12-year-old OS several stays of execution, but the company has said it will finally end extended support on 8 April 2014 – despite the fact that XP remains the second-most popular OS, with almost a 1/3 of all PCs running it. These hundreds of millions of desktops and laptops will be vulnerable to hackers once XP stops receiving security updates, with Microsoft warning earlier this year that hackers could use patches issued for Windows 7 or Windows 8 to scout for XP exploits. “The very first month that Microsoft releases security updates for supported versions of Windows, attackers will reverse-engineer those updates, find the vulnerabilities and test Windows XP to see if it shares [them],” wrote Tim Rains, the director of Microsoft’s Trustworthy Computing group. When hackers develop exploit code they will not have any security updates to overcome, meaning Windows XP will henceforth have a zero-day vulnerability. Microsoft noted that XP shared 30 security holes with Windows 7 and Windows 8 between July 2012 and July 2013, giving hackers ample opportunity to reverse-engineer vulnerabilities. Windows 7 will continue receiving patches but Microsoft will no longer issue safe underwritten patches. Failure to migrate could leave businesses open to infections, denial-of-service attacks and data theft, according to Camwood. Aside from the inconvenience and costs to...